F#@K YOU COKE!

Every year we host The #PlasticCapChallenge, in which we try and limit our plastic consumption and encourage others to do the same.  We’ve raised a few thousand dollars during these challenges, we’ve heightened awareness about plastic consumption, and we’ve tried to spotlight major pollution issues as well as steps to make things better.  We’ve talked to professors, scientists, and scholars about global warming, and the horrendous effects that will continue to come our way if there aren’t major changes immediately!  The situation is disastrous.

The consensus seems to be that the most important step we can take is to elect officials that understand the urgency of the moment, folks who are willing to force companies to stop unsustainable practices.  

Major polluting companies have been given decades to make measurable changes and mountains of evidence to support the need for change.  What have they done with all that time and information?  Profit!

There’s been a push to place the burden of change on the consumer to recycle or use plastic alternatives going all the way back to the 1970’s.  Meanwhile lobbyists have been pushing for laws that outlaw the restriction of plastics especially plastics that have no chance of being recycled.  In fact, 18 states now have preemptive laws stopping local regulation against single use plastic.

This seems akin to reading a shitty book, then accepting the blame for its shittyness because we should have arranged the words in a way that made the book less shitty.  Meanwhile the author is encouraged to write nothing but shitty books which we are then forced to read because there are laws created by the shitty author preventing alternative books from being written.  Also, instead of just being a shitty book, the words are polluting the globe to the point that there will be more plastic in the ocean (by volume) than all the fish combined by 2050.

Who is the shittiest author of them all, who is the #1 global polluter?  Coca-Cola.  200,000 metric tons of botched plastic waste is created by Coca-Cola every year.  Plastics from Coke, along with Pepsi, Nestle, and Unilever end up being burnt due to lack of recycling thus creating 4.6 million tons of CO2 in developing countries every year.  There are no alternatives, recycling is not an option in third world countries.  Companies like Coca-Cola are fantastic at saying they are aware of the problem, and promise to make X changes by year Y.  But when they fail to meet their self-initiated goal, what are the repercussions?  Nothing.  Just make another goal for some other future date.

It may be impossible to know the cost benefit analysis for companies like Coca-Cola, and it may be impossible to know how long they have known how harmful their products are to the environment and the consumer.  To call Coke the bad guy is pointless because contrary to what the justice system might say, corporations aren’t people.  But since the 1970’s Coke has been run by people who were and are fully aware of the negative environmental impact of Coca-Cola packaging and products. Despite that awareness they consistently put profit over people.  Thanks for that Coke!

It’s worth noting that in the early 2000’s Coke faced allegations of illegal soil and water pollution as well as severe human rights violations.  They even faced a lawsuit which claimed that they openly engaged so-called “death squads” to intimidate, torture, kidnap, and even murder union officials in Latin America, which was eventually dismissed. 

Aside from the global pollution, Coca-Cola could certainly brand itself as a leader in personal pollution as well.  It has been established that sugar filled drinks have astoundingly negative effects on our bodies.  Tooth decay, increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, and associations with cancer are just some of the endearing qualities associated with sugary drinks like Coca-Cola.  And of course, right there at the center of the health concerns are Coke execs lobbying to sway the standing on how sugary drinks affect public health.  All while making ads that seem to target kids.  Classy move Coke.  Classy move!

It’s still important to do our part. It doesn’t hurt to try and recycle properly and raise money for entitles trying to make the planet a better place.  But there is only so much consumers can do so long as corporations continue to display their allegiance to profit.  Or so long as our laws allow them to continue to profit from pollution.

Coca-Cola CEO James Quincey was compensated $17,623,796 in 2020 for a company that has a net worth of $230,000,000,000.  I’m not sure what the best solution is, but with that type of money maybe Coke can try and figure it out.  Maybe the people at Coke can look to make a real and significant difference now, instead of moving the goal post every time they fail to meet their arbitrary future goals. 

Will they?  

I wonder what this world is going to look like when Coca-Cola has a net worth of $300,000,000,000?

Coca-Cola has over 200 brands in over 200 countries, here are a few just in case you want to look for alternatives.

Coca-ColaFantaSpriteSchweppsBarq’sDasani
Smart WaterMinute MaidInnocentSimplyTopo ChicoFuze Tea
HonestPoweradeCielFrescaPeace TeaGold Peak
Carrot

71 Replies to “F#@K YOU COKE!”

  1. I bought lemons to make squash. 🍋🍋🍋🍋🍋 Only by sending someone in to buy them, I made a mistake by not telling them to buy without the plastic string bag. In future I will need to be on the ball and be specific. Thing is, it just doesn’t make sense to me, as buying in a bag is cheaper.

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Make sure they’re well washed and all the pips are out, rough chop, boil till soft, blitz and add sugar, dilute and cool.

        Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree…a popular recommendation is to move to refill stations like you would find at restaurants and bars. They’d save money on packaging, and immediately help limit their impact.

      Like

    2. Glass straws are great. They are reusable, make you look cooler than you might be, and you feel better about yourself. LOL. Every little bit helps.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for putting some of their brands at the bottom. That is what annoys me, when they hide behind water drinks whilst stealing water, ruining the environment and encouraging continued plastic usage.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s so hard Linda…I made a drink yesterday that was so good though. Just club soda, with cut up watermelon, cherries, and mango in the bottom, and it hit the spot. Then I had a bonus fruit salad when I was done drinking it haha!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. At some point in the 2000s car battery manufactures started making better battery casings. Before that, I would often have to clean the corrosive gunk on the connection posts and there was nothing better for cleaning the metal posts than coke. It would eat it right up. Now imagine the long term damage it causes to the lining of the stomach over years of consumption. It happened to my dad. He had to stop drinking soda all together.

    Also, Coke, Pepsi, Nestle and I forget what the French brand was. They would buy sections of rivers for manufacturing use and then just expel the contaminated water to flow down stream. This has killed a lot of people in India. In 2004, I met the last three survivors of a village that was downstream from a Coke aluminum can plant. During that trip we secretly met with several people who feared for their lives. It’s crazy!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. HOLY COW…everything about this is horrifying! I’m really sorry to hear all of this, especially how Coke as impacted your own dad! Thank you for the story and insight!

      Liked by 2 people

  4. I do everything I know to do and that is in my power, but sometimes the absurdity of my minuscule effort strikes me (usually after a visit to the supermarket). Am I DOING anything or just making myself feel better? Then I get sane again and think, “Everyone who does this is ONE plastic bag less. That has to be something.” But it really isn’t much. It would be easier if I didn’t remember a time when beverages came in glass bottles that were returned to the company where they were sterilized, washed and refilled. And the “carton” in which they came was an actual cardboard (thin cardboard) carton. We did that. The ONLY thing I think plastic bottles should be used for is shampoo and THAT’s because sometimes we drop those things and glass in the shower isn’t much fun but even THERE I am totally behind shampoo bars instead of liquid. It’s all one step forward, two steps back.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Martha, I haven’t even considered that it wasn’t long ago that Coke introduced plastic to their companies growth. They have the formula for Coke without plastic, it’s the called the past. Such a terrific point!

      I get demoralized too, and wonder if any of this makes a difference, but you are right, one less bag or bottle is better than nothing.

      Liked by 3 people

  5. Once again, it is because we do not take such things seriously. If we did, the tax structure would be such that Coke couldn’t afford to NOT recycle everything it possibly could.

    Recycling most things other than scrap metal is pure theater. It is still cheaper to make new stuff and throw out the old because the cost of disposal does not include the effect on the environment. Just like there is no fee to put smoke in the air.

    Most of our recycling goes to China/India where it is “recycled” into landfills. The rest becomes fuel for electrical cogeneration and is then deposited into the air as CO2 and various noxious gasses.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I do think it’s funny that we talk about recycling like it’s a new(ish) thing, but 50 years ago milk, beer, and pop bottles were all picked up and refilled indefinitely. The trucks unloaded full bottles through one door and loaded empties through another. Since they had to go back to the warehouse anyway, why not go back with a load?

    Liked by 5 people

    1. That’s the perfect example…Coke has a “History of Coke” on their web site. Not once did they mention a time when they had a formula where they didn’t turn the world into a polluted mess. But bottles are perfect for refills, we’ve done it before.

      I hope we can do it again!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. This is part of the reason why I am doing Plastic Free July this month – sure, as a consumer, I am making good choices by choosing to not buy from these corporations. Plastic is everywhere and so hard to avoid. Everything requires careful planning and even then, you get surprise plastic.
    But the real culprits here are these corporations who can do whatever they want, with nobody holding them accountable.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That is so cool that you are doing Plastic Free July! It is so so hard to avoid plastic. Even plastic free options are often wrapped in plastic! Thank you for the comments. Best wishes on finishing July plastic free!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. I think there is a naivety out there that voting the right people into seats of power will be an enabler for change. The system of governing each and every country on the planet is too far gone. I can’t think of a single country which aligns to my views and wishes, all countries are governed for power and profit, lobbied by big business who pay little to no taxes, handing out massive bonuses to their executives whilst the docile masses are the ones that put the money into government purses.

    Coke is of course just one company, every other corporation is the same. When one is awake to how the whole system functions, it has to be the individual who acts for real change to happen. As individuals we can say no, we can then form local tribes/communities to spread awareness and say no collectively. To think we can lobby our councillors, senators, parliamentarians for change is folly sadly.

    Looked what happened at the Euros Football Championship a few weeks back. Christiano Ronaldo, one of the best and publicly known footballers in the world had a press conference and moved two bottles of Coke aside from the view of the cameras and simply said “Drink water”. There was uproar from the governing body UEFA which wiped off $4bn in shares (yes you read that right – 4 billion dollars), as Coke was the major sponsor of the tournament, and UEFA then threatened to fine anyone doing the same. So a simple action of one individual (albeit a famous one), CAN have a significant impact, Russell Brand here in the UK is trying to do the same here (do check out his YouTube channel – he’s changed so much over recent years from the annoying fop!).

    So be the change you want to see in the world, difficult when marketing and addiction (sugar in the case of Coke, which is in my opinion the worst drug in the world) make it difficult to resist the allure of the product…

    Liked by 3 people

  9. I seem to remember while travelling around South America in 1999 that in probably every country a lot of the bottled water brands were owned by Coca Crapola unfortunately.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. In Nicaragua in the 80s, if you bought a Coke it was poured into a plastic bag and they kept the bottle to refill. One bit a hole in a corner of the bag and drank it from there – still plastic, but less of it. To buy rum, you had to bring your own bottle and it was filed for you.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. There’s really no upside to Coke, every part is bad for you or bad for the environment. But there is a little light – you also mention Unilever, they have realised the downside of their branded plastics turning up in the stomachs of sea turtles etc, the undeniable evidence of their pollution. So they are finally starting to try and remedy things, with written commitments to that effect (not that I have much faith in any of that) but even though it is driven by financial considerations around reputation it is hopefully a step in the right direction. We can only hope that the rest follow suit. And we can force their hand; it’s simple really, avoid their products. I’m not a great fan of water but leave some slices of cucumber, thyme, mint leaves, lemon/lime/orange, or any blend of them in water overnight and it is transformed.

    Incidentally I believe Coke is transported as a syrup to be diluted and must be labelled and treated as a toxic substance before the water is added to make it ‘drinkable’.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That is good to hear about Unilever…and wild yet believable that Coke is labelled as a toxic substance, yet another little detail that you won’t find on their website!

      Like

  11. Until we force corporations to absorb the real costs of the waste they produce, I doubt anything will change. Changing consumer behavior is just about as difficult. Still, it’s important to keep sounding out about the travesty of it all. Thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Hopefully a difference can be made…I’m kind of afraid that we are beyond the point of small steps matter, but it has to be better than nothing.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We certainly shouldn’t throw up our hands and say “my habits don’t matter”. But solving the problem will indeed take big measures.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Companies pollute, are ruining the planet, then campaign for us to clean up their messes. THEY should be doing the cleanup.

      Liked by 2 people

  12. I agree! Terrible on Cokes behalf. We are trying to get rid of plastic since it has horrible effects on wildlife, ocean animals and just isn’t good for our ecosystem.
    I hereby boycott Coke for their terrible job in limited plastics. Shame on you Coke. #cokesucks

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ignorance is no excuse. Ignorance means to ignore. Too many of us ignore the facts and truths of day-to-day life. Sugar causes inflammation. Plastic containers leach into the drinks and foods. Off-gassing is deadly. And we wonder why we die from things like cancer and end up sick unto death with new diseases and illnesses. Better living through chemistry? 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I gave up fizzy drinks years ago fro health reasons but am glad to see it’s helping reduce plastic too – I will remember that when I feel tempted next time. You have me thinking again – still so much to give up. Still got the big one to tackle though – population . . .

    Liked by 1 person

  14. It’s really important to write to these companies. Unless they hear complaints from thousands of consumers they will just keep on keeping on.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. You bet. Writing to these polluting monsters it’s about the only thing I can do. I’ll put Coke on my list as soon as I get done with Procter & Gamble!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I wish. The average consumer cannot write simple declarative sentences. Letters? I wish. We can’t be bothered.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Alanna, “Why bother?” seems to be the attitude taken my the majority. Here in Texas anyway.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Bobbie Jean- I know the “Why Bother”syndrome is so frustrating. It’s not even in Texas but among my friends here in Oregon. Speaking for myself, if I am so disheartened by the apathy of so many and I don’t take action, I am an equal part of the problem. Therefore I do my phone calls, my letters, buy more expensive recycled toilet paper and the what not. Whether ultimately they make a difference or not, I know I tried and can sleep at night. It’s also good to realize the people that bother are often not loud, they work behind the scenes like myself. I’m sure there are others in Texas that “bother,” they just aren’t obvious. If these big corporations don’t hear any complaints, they will assume we are all OK with the status quo. So I will continue my complaining, one coporation at a time. Good luck to you in the Lone Star state!

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Both of my thumbs salute you. Thanks for the good luck. We need it.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. 100% on board with what you are saying in this post. It would be interesting to know who is the biggest user of plastic “soda” containers, my guess is developed countries. I’m pretty sure that it’s not 3rd world countries (except maybe China). While I’m sure that there are areas in 3rd world countries that use plastic soda bottles, the vast majority use glass bottles that are reused. It is interesting to note though and one that I never read about is that in some 3rd world countries the soda in the glass bottle when purchased is transferred into a single-use plastic bag with a plastic straw. Yup defeating the whole purpose for the glass bottle.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That sure does defeat the entire purpose of the bottle. I agree the developed nations must use so much more plastic, and are more equipped to recycle, but on the whole recycling has so many shortfalls worldwide! The whole institution is really frustrating!

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Cuba comes to mind. I imagine they still have original Coke bottle. All glass bottles. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Thanks for this well-written post (and for liking my post). I didn’t realise “Innocent” was a Coke product – sickening hypocrisy or what? It’s a monumental task to avoid plastics in our modern world, but these sorts of drinks are decadent indulgences that are really easy to avoid, and I never buy any. I’ve recently made two changes to my plastic consumption, making my own buttery spread, so I just keep re-filling the same margarine tub I bought a year ago (it’s just softened butter, oil and water, blended), and making my own yoghurt (a bit more complicated, and I’m using milk, but it cuts out the pile of cartons I used to buy). If I did a full assessment of the energy, plastics and other environmental costs of those, it would still be worrying, but it’s a step in the right direction.

    Like

  17. I do not consume anything from Coke for two reasons, plastic and sugar. I stopped consuming sugar 4 years ago and I dodge plastic stuff (f#@tupper ware) since years now too. Coke behave the way it does because they get along with it. Plastic is cheaper than tin glass, so their profit is even higher. Keep up your great work! The planet truly needs it. Thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

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